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I have one semester to teach financial literacy to my high school juniors and seniors. I know I am very luck, but it is a short period of time. Which topics are the most critical for their financial futures and how deep do I really need to go?

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Posted by klfocht
Asked on January 14, 2016 4:50 am
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The Most Important aspect is to teach that the Budget is a MAP of where you want to go.

The Budget is not “something that keeps me from doing stuff.”
And the most important single habit is “Pay Yourself first.”

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Posted by DavidBattleBuddy
Answered on January 14, 2016 7:03 am
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In my opinion, credit is the most important. I hit it hard and make sure my students know how passionate I am about it.
Secondly, I feel saving and the importance of starting as early as you can is next.

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Posted by kmccormick
Answered on January 15, 2016 5:43 am
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It all begins with a goal they want to accomplish and the budget (e.g. the plan) they create to work toward it. Budgeting is needed to start the whole process so they understand where the money is going and they can become intentional with the dollars they have coming in. With the budget, I see a lot of them online in different forms. The area for goals, saving, and giving are not on all the budgets I find. It is important for students to learn be intentional with each dollar they bring in so they need to think about paying themselves first. The only way you can do that is through budgeting and intentionally saving money as they would with spending.

Since money is something we deal with each day, it is important to let students know being a good steward of their dollars allows them to reach goals along with flexibility when it comes to their careers and living situations.

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Posted by kossjoe1999
Answered on January 16, 2016 2:12 pm
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As a high school student that goes to a school where most students attend a four year institution upon graduation, I really wanted to know more about Paying for College. I think it would be a great thing to teach second semester juniors so they have an idea of what kind of college they may think of applying to and they could visit those colleges over the summer. I also think lessons about credit scores are important because it is something students can start building from that age.

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Posted by Ren Makino
Answered on January 19, 2016 8:24 pm
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I’m a cheater, and I’m going to paste in my response I gave to mrsprester’s question about the top 5 essential topics. Here they are, in my humble opinion:

1). Budgeting, because it’s essential and kind of fun (am I sick?).
2). Checking, because it’s the foundation for TONS of other transactions.
3). Credit, because it’s the easiest place to REALLY screw yourself up, and it can take forever to fix once you let it happen.
4). Student loans, because how you pay for college has consequences that can last 25 YEARS…
5). Investing — this is my new pet passion. With the gap in net wealth in this country getting huger by the day, I feel it’s a social justice issue that ALL young people learn how investing works. If you live in a community where “investing is something OTHER people do…” and no one teaches you the importance of a 401(k) or other retirement fund. EEEK. Even though you can’t teach EVERYTHING about investing in the scope of a high school class, at least if students become familiarized with the lingo and some basic strategies, they’ll feel a little more at home in the “investment world.”

I hope that helps!

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Posted by Jessica Endlich
Answered on February 1, 2016 10:56 pm
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