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This would be a good teaching tool in lower income areas where checking and savings accounts are not the norm.

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Posted by Rjschlachra
Asked on January 16, 2016 3:39 am
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I like this idea. I think having students keep track of their money in some sort of ledger can help them see how much they have as well as what they can afford to buy. If they don’t have the funds to pay for something, they will need to learn to save and contribute dollars to this account so they can make a purchase. It creates so many skills outside of money management like organization, tracking, and goal setting.

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Posted by kossjoe1999
Answered on January 16, 2016 11:50 am
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Though it sounds like a ton of work, Jill Lucero (member of the pilot version of our online Professional Learning Community) shared the classroom incentives strategy she uses with her students. In overview form, they earn 4 “dollars” per day for coming to class, with raises for high report card grades; they then have to “pay” her for privileges such as hall pass or infractions such as tardiness; they keep a checkbook register for each of their transactions in and out; and they can then do “buy backs,” trading their savings in for the chance to resubmit missing or incorrect work before the marking period ends. Legitimately, it seems like an amazing way to teach SO many concepts AND do a little classroom management with students barely realizing. And, she reports they become quite miserly — rethinking the hall pass so they can hold onto their money for buy back season…

It’s maybe achieving the same thing you’re getting at with the student store but could work for schools that don’t have a store. I’ll double-check with her and then post a few samples of what she uses in her class.

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Posted by Jessica Endlich
Answered on February 1, 2016 11:24 pm
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