« Back to Previous Page
0
0

More specifically, how have you introduced them to these strategies? What do you do in class to help support them?

Marked as spam
Posted by Andrew Furth
Asked on December 16, 2015 12:46 pm
85 views
3
Private answer

For a little fun in my class, I have all the students keep their change for the entire semester and then on the honor system we give our totals at the end. It is a good way for the students to see how change can add up.

Marked as spam
Posted by jjlucero
Answered on December 17, 2015 9:32 am
2
Private answer

I have students set a short, intermediate, and long term goal in the beginning of the year. I tell students if they don’t already have a Savings Account, that has to be their short term goal. That gets the ball rolling and then we conclude our budgeting unit with a personal budget in which they set a savings goal and the expectation is that they meet that goal.

Marked as spam
Posted by mrk
Answered on December 17, 2015 5:34 am
0
Private answer

Like @mrk, we have students come up with a short-term savings goal (something that has monetary value – video game, phone, concert tickets, etc.). From there, it’s easier for students to get a sense of how long it might take for them to reach that goal depending on their sources of income. This also brings up discussions about needs, wants and level of “want.”

Marked as spam
Posted by Anna
Answered on December 23, 2015 4:52 pm
0
Private answer

My high school has a credit union inside our building and hires seniors as student tellers. They offer a special savings account for senior year expenses. Students can contribute as much or as little as they like, but they cannot withdraw any money until their senior year. The student tellers visit freshmen classes and outline estimated costs for senior year. This tends to be a real eye-opener for many students when they hear from other students the amount of money they need. It motivates many of them to open a savings account.

Marked as spam
Posted by Principato
Answered on January 5, 2016 5:45 am
0
Private answer

I love the idea of saving change for a whole semester. That could be a great way to get them saving and then when they put it in a savings account, they could get extra credit on their semester exam.

Marked as spam
Posted by svanberkum
Answered on January 11, 2016 11:06 am
0
Private answer

I have my students keep an index card to record all of their expenses for an entire week so they can see exactly where their money is going. But then I show them this link for the benefits of investing early and how each of them can retire a millionaire. It is pretty powerful for them to understand that their Starbucks each day or getting their nails done over the course of 30 plus years can amount to hundreds of thousands for dollars. http://www.daveramsey.com/blog/how-teens-can-become-millionaires/

Marked as spam
Posted by mbentivegna
Answered on January 11, 2016 11:52 am
0
Private answer

I like to show the chart of saving $1 – week 1 – $2 for week 2 and so on through 52 weeks of the year as to how quickly it can add up.

Marked as spam
Answered on January 11, 2016 12:05 pm
0
Private answer

In addition to saving the change, when you save it in a clear glass container, the students have the “sound” of the coins hitting the glass, and it’s human nature to want to fill it up, OR you can draw lines every couple of inches for a visual goal setting …. Can you save a half a foot of coins? Smaller containers could be filled up, so maybe you have a “race” to fill it up… When the first person reaches the goal, others will follow.

Marked as spam
Posted by DavidBattleBuddy
Answered on January 14, 2016 7:15 am
« Back to Previous Page