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Posted by cmesko
Asked on January 15, 2016 4:05 am
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I love that elementary level math touches upon coins ( picture math) and money in word problems. In my opinion, this is the start and should continue to be built upon in more detail as kids approach and go through middle school. As money becomes more universally relevant to them, as is the case for most kids starting high school, then more formal education should take place.

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Posted by DFS
Answered on January 16, 2016 1:31 am
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Cambridge University did a study back a few years ago that shows that most children by age 7 know how to recognize the value of money and can count it out. It is important that we introduce some personal finance skills to our kids when they are young and in elementary school. They already have a basic grasp of money so showing them good financial habits that we have as parents can help. A lot is caught by our kids instead of taught so they do follow your example when it comes to money habits.

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Posted by kossjoe1999
Answered on January 18, 2016 3:37 pm
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I agree the minute they enter kindergarten they should have some sort of financial literacy instruction- can be used to play store in their free time center

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Posted by Rjschlachra
Answered on January 16, 2016 3:41 am
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I believe the earlier you introduce students to financial literacy the better. They need to know how to count money and understand the value of it at an earlier age. With technology today they will be using debit cards by the time they are ten years old. They need to know you have to work for money; that it isn’t regularly given out.

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Posted by RSaymansky
Answered on January 20, 2016 12:29 pm
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I’d second the notion that it’s never too young to start teaching about personal finance. As a matter of fact, I created a project where your high school students will essentially answer cmesko’s question above (It’s “Saving in Pre-K?” on this project bank page: http://nextgenpersonalfinance.org/curriculum/savings-projects/)

On the other hand, I feel like learning sticks better when it’s applicable to our students’ lives in the near future. So, a lesson on income taxes in 7th grade probably doesn’t go over too well. A lesson on income taxes in 10th or 11th grade, when many of your students may have picked up part-time jobs and wondered where all their earnings are going, is far more timely. Similarly, our most popular activity to date (Create a Salary Based Budget: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1BrZ6ymAb-2iNoG5dhKL_Aer9wLdyLKm2b4Z9QcNgHTU) tends to be a huge hit with high school seniors and college students, but it’s a little less meaningful if you do it in 9th grade.

So, never too early to start teaching, but if you want the lessons to stick, timeliness matters .

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Posted by Jessica Endlich
Answered on February 1, 2016 11:12 pm
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