Schools In News

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Schools in the News!

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Northfield Community School math teacher Karen Schroeder’s wish list includes owning a boat someday. On Thursday morning, she and school Principal Kevin Morrison took 45 seventh-graders to the Progressive Insurance Atlantic City Boat Show at the Convention Center and put them to work on a real-life financial literacy problem: Could they find a boat that met both Schroeder’s wish list and her budget, between $20,000 and $40,000?

  • Seventh-graders from USM win Wisconsin Stock Market Simulation (North Shore Now)

By |March 16th, 2017|Schools In News|

The Money Question: Do You Want Overdraft Protection?

Thanks to Mountain View High for inviting me to their AVID class last week (and for the next 7 Thursdays) to teach personal finance. Today’s topic was “How To Manage Your Checking Account.” I started with the Bank role play activity to highlight the questions that students should be prepared to ask PRIOR to opening an account. Asking the right questions has to be the foundational skill we need to develop in any financial education course.

The students responses included the importance of FEES with several discussing the pain that they felt when overdraft fees hit their account. During the role play, I asked the “money question” that all new accountholders will be asked when opening an account: “Would you like overdraft protection?” 

Why We Do What We Do

What a great way to start a Tuesday! We received this email overnight:

“Stumbled upon your website in January as I’m currently teaching a brand new Economics and Personal Finance at a high school in Honolulu, Hawaii. Absolutely love your units, lessons and activities and how you are willing to share for free!! I cannot thank you enough for developing all this AWESOME curriculum and sharing with teachers so freely!!”

You have to love the internet and how it enables small organizations like NGPF to have national (and even global) reach. We strive to develop content that teachers can “stumble upon” and implement in their classrooms quickly and effectively. We also love hearing how we can better serve you, so please keep the feedback coming!

By |March 1st, 2017|Schools In News|

Schools in the News

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  • Altoona teacher awarded for her work with personal finance (Leader Telegram)

An Altoona High School teacher won a statewide award Thursday for her work as a personal finance instructor and involvement in a financial literacy program for high school students. Kelly Ostrander, in her 27th year at Altoona High School, received the 2016 Financial Literacy Award in the legacy category. 

  • What high school freshmen are learning could save you thousands of dollars (WBAY)

It’s easier than ever to find your credit score–an important number that could save you thousands of dollars over time. That’s why high school freshmen in Ashwaubenon are learning a lesson about building good credit as a requirement for graduation. Students in Mr. Lotto’s Career and Financial Planning Class live and work in a virtual world via an online personal finance program.

Pelham High School’s freshman class got a taste of what it’s like to be an adult on Friday, Feb. 10, during Keeping it Real, a program created by the Greater Shelby County Chamber of

By |February 15th, 2017|Schools In News|

Schools in the News

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  • Hall, Gainesville schools put renewed focus on teaching personal finance (Gainesville Times)

Eighth-graders in Janet Roland’s business and computer science class at Gainesville Middle School got a dose of what so many Americans appear to have a tough time doing — putting together a budget and sticking to it. Roland handed out a sheet that explained a recent class exercise for her students.

By |February 2nd, 2017|Current Events, Personal Finance, Schools In News|

Amanda Volz, NGPF Fellow, celebrates another big win in Budget Challenge

NGPF Fellow Amanda Volz has been teaching for 15 years and is now celebrating her students’ THIRD CONSECUTIVE YEAR of winning BIG ($20,000 big) in the H&R Block Budget Challenge. Amanda’s students not only benefit from her amazing, innovative teaching style but also from their school’s prioritizing financial literacy enough to offer a full year Financial Management course.

By |January 25th, 2017|Featured Teachers, NGPF Fellows, Schools In News|

Schools in the News

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  • Making sense of dollars: Susan Lidholm paces students through personal finance basics (Columbia Daily Tribune)

Susan Lidholm’s personal finance students at Rock Bridge High School have a track record of competing and placing in national competitions. So, it’s no surprise that Blaine Forshee describes Lidholm as an effective, “super approachable” teacher.

  • UD alum, global economic educator Kasman workshops with master’s students (UDaily)

When searching for solutions to the world’s most serious problems, many would agree that education is a clear choice. But few could explain specifically how education can help solve issues like poverty, governmental instability and social inequality. Working to find those answers is Romina Kasman, an educational consultant for the Department of Social Inclusion at the Organization of American States (OAS), a partnership between all 35 independent nations of the Americas.

  • Helping high schoolers manage money (IowaNow)

Artisha Norris signed up for a debit card so she wouldn’t ruin her credit. Jazzy Jones started budgeting her expenses. Quenisha Wood is more careful about where she spends her money. This wasn’t the case for the three Iowa City High School seniors before last year when, they admit, they knew

By |January 18th, 2017|Schools In News|

Schools in the News

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  • Conference helps Holmen teacher enhance money management curriculum (La Crosse Tribune):

A Holmen High School business teacher recently had the opportunity to acquire more tools for guiding her students in money management. Amy McCutchen received a scholarship to attend the 2016 Jump$tart National Educator Conference Nov. 5-7 in Dallas, Texas.

For Appleton high schoolers, there are moments when it clicks. Plotting out their futures, they add up the cost of college tuition and living expenses. They look at the projected income of their prospective career. They calculate the weight of student loans attached to their plans. It sinks in.

By |January 4th, 2017|Schools In News|