Research

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As More And More Spending Moves Online…

It becomes easier to spend mindlessly. This is a great graphic (for more, check out this CNN article) to get your class talking about their spending habits:

Sketch-OneClickBuy

Ask your students to think back to items they have bought online recently from Amazon (or other websites) and how many are

Question: What Regions of the Country Have The Most Upward Mobility?

The Equality of Opportunity Project released a vast trove of data last Wednesday focused, as its name suggests, on identifying characteristics in communities that foster upward mobility. In looking at over 700 metro and rural areas in the U.S., the researchers defined upward mobility in terms of a children’s chances of reaching the top 20% in income distribution given parents in the bottom 20%.

Here’s the results from crunching lots of data (note the legend that indicates lighter areas as having more upward mobility):

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  • An obvious question when one looks at a map like this is “what factors drive upward mobility?” Here’s what the researchers found:
By |January 22nd, 2017|Career, Current Events, Policy, Question of the Day, Research|

Question: What Are The Ten Most Popular Passwords?

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Before I answer, please let your students know if their password shows up below on this list, they better change it NOW!

Answer (from Consumerist):

By |January 19th, 2017|Current Events, Identity Theft, Question of the Day, Research|

Chart: How Much of Millennials’ Food Budget Is Spent on Dining Away From Home?

Answer: 47%

From The Atlantic/BLS:

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The chart is interesting when you look at it over a 20 year arc (instead of focusing on the short term ups and downs), where seniors have actually increased their dining away from home more than the other age groups (on a percentage basis).

From the Atlantic:

Chart: How Strong Are American’s Problem-Solving Skills Using A Computer?

From Economist:

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Answer: Meh (or about average for OECD countries with about 33% of adults classified in the “High” category).

This Economist article focused on the need for retraining of low-skilled workers as the pace of automation accelerates and many of their jobs go the way of the buggy whip. As for how to accomplish this, Singapore has a promising example:

By |January 16th, 2017|Article, Career, Chart of the Week, Current Events, Policy, Research|

In My Personal Finance Life: Want A FICO Score With That Free Credit Report?

It’s a new year which makes it a good time to review your credit report. I went to annualcreditreport.com, answered a few questions to verify my identity and proceeded to my credit report. As I completed my review, I couldn’t help but notice the offer about getting my credit score (can you say cross-selling opportunity?). When I clicked on the button…

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What’s the catch?

By |January 15th, 2017|Advertising, Credit Reports, Credit Scores, Current Events, Research|

Question: How Much Debt Do Consumers Have?

A great opener to your Types of Credit unit. Start by asking your students to rank from largest to smallest the various types of consumer debt:

  • Credit Cards
  • Mortgages
  • Auto Loans
  • Student Loans

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Answer and visual below (from Visual Capitalist and Equifax): $12.4 trillion (as of August 2016)

Know Thy Source: Rule #1 in Digital Literacy

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Those who use NGPF resources know that we place a premium on teaching students how to navigate the web, discern credible sources of information and do the research required to make sound financial decisions. Occasionally we get pushback that our content should be “commercial free” and that linking to an online article that has ads anywhere on the page is “commercial” and students should not be subjected such distraction. Newsflash: The Internet has gone commercial. All that free content has to be paid for somehow. Isn’t it better that we teach students to be skeptical, critical thinkers about advertising instead of pretending that they can wall themselves off in an ad-free world.