Professional Development

/Professional Development
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NGPF Podcast: Tim Talks to FinLit Mover and Shaker Brett Burkey

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He’s written personal finance workbooks, successfully lobbied Florida legislators, trained hundreds of teachers and taught thousands of students in his career. Oh, he also was a pioneer in bringing a blended learning model into his classroom. Who’s “he”? That would be educator Brett Burkey who took time to appear on the NGPF podcast to share insights from his incredible career. From the statehouse to the classroom, Brett describes how he was able to engage his audience to bring about change. Enjoy!
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NGPF Podcast: Tim Talks to NGPF Fellow Charles Kafoglis About His Four Principles to Teaching Personal Finance

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Thanks to Charles Kafoglis of Incarnate Word in Houston, Texas for sharing his insights recently on the NGPF podcast. I got to know Charles through his participation in our Summer Institute in 2016. I saw firsthand his passion for financial education and have enjoyed our ongoing dialogue about different approaches to teaching investing. In this podcast, Charles shares the four key principles that serve as the foundation for his personal finance course as well as how his course ties into the leadership program at his high school. Finally, he will share how he sets the tone for his course early in the semester and the resources he relies upon to do that. Enjoy!

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NGPF Podcast: Tim Talks To Odelia Younge and Jennifer Kabaker About Micro-Credential Program At Digital Promise

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Many personal finance teachers don’t feel confident teaching the subject. There are often hurdles to participating in effective professional development including distance, dollars and relevance. The good news is that there are innovative organizations creating solutions to this problem. I spoke with leaders at one of these innovative companies, Digital Promise, about their micro-credentialing platform, which is designed to build finance educator competencies. Thanks to Odelia Younge and Jennifer Kabaker for discussing their micro-credential program and how educators can benefit from this new approach to professional development. Enjoy!


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NGPF Podcast: Tim Talks To Blended Learning Aficionado Steve Penley

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Thanks to Steve Penley of Waubonsie Valley High School (Aurora, Illinois) for coming on the NGPF podcast recently. Steve came to our attention through his participation in the NGPF Professional Learning Communities (PLC) program that Jessica (from NGPF) facilitates. In Jessica’s words, “Steve provides tons of great feedback to other participants and stays abreast of new technologies and tools which is incredibly valuable to the group.” In this podcast, Steve shares the reasons that he participates in PLCs, as well as his insights on how to run a blended learning classroom along with his favorite lesson. He will also tell you about a few of his favorite online resources and tech tools. Enjoy!

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My Summer Institute Experience: A retrospective from NGPF Fellow Maureen Neuner

When you’re selected as an NGPF Summer Institute participant, you not only join us for 3 days in the summer but also commit to being an NGPF Fellow for the following school year. Fellows have a menu of actions they can complete to earn points, with the goal of earning 100 points by the end of the school year and receiving a stipend for their extra efforts. I can say, from our side, the Fellows have been instrumental this school year in shaping what NGPF does, so we love having them!

One of their menu options is generating a guest blog post for our NGPF site, and Maureen decided to write about her Summer Institute (and follow up) experience. Interested in applying? Maureen will likely convince you with the following: 

By |January 26th, 2017|NGPF Fellows, Professional Development, Summer Institute|

NGPF’s Steps Up Commitment to Professional Development in 2017

You may have seen this recent announcement: Next Gen Personal Finance is pleased to announce a $120,000 challenge grant to Champlain College’s Center for Financial Literacy led by John Pelletier. This funding will enable dozens of Vermont financial educators to receive a graduate-level training program over the next three summers at the College. We are excited about restarting this program in Vermont which had great success earlier in the decade. Survey after survey shows teachers begging for more training to help boost their content knowledge and their confidence in the classroom. 2017 will see a dramatic increase in NGPF’s offerings to satisfy that demand.

Our ambitious plans over the next twelve months include:

Guest Blog from Sue Suttich: “401(k) = Cha Ching!”

When she was at Summer Institute 2016, NGPF Fellow Sue Suttich told us about the “Cha-Ching” policy she uses in her classroom. Now, as a follow-up, she’s providing all of you with this catchy strategy she implements throughout the year to help her students remember the most important personal finance concepts. Thanks for sharing, Sue!

Let Them Tell Stories Too…

download (3)As educators, we know the power of storytelling in the personal finance classroom. What better way to bring an abstract or dry topic like compound interest to life than to explain how $10,000 you invested in your IRA in your 20s was now worth $30,000 today due to gains in the stock market compounded over many years. There is even research that shows that student recall concepts better when told as a story as compared to a lecture (from Bryant and Harris):

The use of storytelling allows lecturers to engage students in a dynamic and enthusiastic way while encouraging students to develop a higher order of thinking and recollection. Storytelling allows the lecturer to show their interest in the material and in the students. Lectures can utilize the art of storytelling to communicate expertise and transfer information. This paper empirically examines the effectiveness of storytelling as a means of increasing student intrigue and recollection. We find that students recall a statistically significant 6.5% more of the storytelling lecture than those students who were exposed to the text book lecture.

Yet the focus when we talk about stories is usually on the teacher and yet…students have their stories and advice to share also. I was reminded of that today at Eastside College Prep., where we are beginning our 6-week course with the senior class. The discussion was about savings and why it can be so difficult to save. A student shared how she had a weak spot for her “hobbies” which she described in further detail with one word: shoes. I dug a bit deeper to understand more about her habits and she proceeded to say something along the lines of this: