Personal Finance

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NGPF Podcast: Tim Talks to Kiplinger Editor and Author Janet Bodnar

It was great to have Kiplinger editor Janet Bodnar on the podcast recently. As a newly minted college graduate, I recall leafing through a Kiplinger magazine (pre-internet) and benefitting from their practical, easy to understand financial advice. As an editor, columnist and author, Janet has an amazing depth of knowledge about personal finance. We focused our conversation on what we should be teaching young people about money as well as the importance of encouraging women to develop financial skills. You will get great advice about investing while learning about Janet’s collecting habits which she gleefully displays on her home refrigerator. Enjoy!

Details:

By |June 19th, 2017|Current Events, Index Funds, Investing, Personal Finance, Podcasts|

Do Your Weekly Lunches Cost You $90,000 in Retirement Savings?

“US households spent $3,008, or about $8.35 a day, on average, eating out in 2015… Investing $3,008 each year… would add up 30 years later to… more than $250,000.  Similarly, investing $3.50 a day for 30 years instead of buying a latte would add up to savings of nearly $107,000”. (USA Today, June 2017)

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We all know that it is hard to save enough for retirement.  Financial education teachers also know that students sometimes struggle to relate decisions in their current, daily lives, with how much they will need when they retire much later in life.  This interesting article attempts to help close this inter-temporal gap by framing our current weekly spending choices in terms of equivalent dollar amount closer to retirement.  “Is eating lunch out two times a week worth losing out on a potential investment windfall of $88,000?”

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Questions for Students:

Video: What Can An Inmate At San Quentin Teach Us About Personal Finance?

Hat tip to Ren Makino for pointing out this TED video (11:03) that demonstrates how the need for financial education permeates every corner of American society:

Questions:

NGPF’s Top 15 Activities, Courtesy of Jessica Endlich

Given the comprehensive nature of our website (full disclosure: Sometimes I forget that we have certain projects/activities/data crunches/blog posts….), teachers often ask us “OK, but what are the best resources that you can recommend?” At that point, we typically turn to Jessica and she always has a few ideas to recommend. So, this month, we asked Jessica to provide us with her “Best of NGPF” specifically for the last days of school.

The responses we got from teachers was nothing short of ecstatic with lots of exclamation points too! Note the various ways that teachers plan to utilize this list of end-of-year activities:

  • “I LOVE your TOP 15 List!!!   It came at just the right time as my new job has me looking for 4 weeks of FUN, ENGAGING lessons for our new freshmen Business exploratory!! I can’t wait to try ALL of these out!  They seem PERFECT, sparking early interest in our Business courses that are often overlooked!!
  • OMG!  Thank you so much… I must be out of my classroom just one day before the end of the term.  I was having a hard time developing meaningful sub plans so late in the course (and so close to the end of school).  I’m going to watch the “All Time Favorite Video” tonight and create some reflection questions.
 Here are Jessica‘s favorites to fill these last few days before summer break:

We Are #7, We Are #7, We Are #7: When Is the U.S. Going to Commit To Financial Education?

PISA Financial Literacy results are out and here are the standings (by country):

What I’m Reading This Weekend

Catching up on my reading this week perusing personal finance articles, blogs, newsletters. Here’s what looks interesting:

  • Dan Kadlec in Right About Money uses the recent ransomware hack to make the point (confirmed by research) that the financially astute are often more prone to falling for financial scams.

Interactive: Which Tech Giant Would You Drop?

Here’s a fun and quick interactive from NY Times to get your students thinking about the pervasiveness of technology companies in their lives. Students are forced to rank order the importance of the top five tech companies in their lives by selecting the order by which they would give them up (if forced by an evil monarch:) The five companies: Alphabet (Google is one of their subsidiaries), Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Microsoft (interesting that three start with the letter “A”).

Questions:

The Need for Financial Education Is Everywhere…!

As we embark on an advocacy strategy that you will see unfold in the weeks and months, I become more convinced everyday that there is a groundswell of grassroots support for making financial education as much a part of K-12 as the three Rs. I also am beginning to recognize the gaping hole that exists for financial programs targeting underserved populations.   This kind of fits the innovation model described in this Clay Christensen Harvard Business Review article where a disrupter targets markets that aren’t being served adequately today. As the list below shows, there seems to be a shortage of financial education providers customizing their product offering to adequately meet the needs of specific populations.

In the last few days alone, NGPF has received unsolicited inquiries from individuals serving diverse populations who are interested in expanding financial capability: