Paying for College

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NGPF Podcast: Tim Talks to Retired Bankruptcy Judge John Ninfo About His Passion For Financial Literacy

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What does a retired bankruptcy judge do to fill his “golden years?” If you are Hon. John Ninfo, you write a weekly column and visit hundreds of classrooms in upstate New York to teach young people about what it means to be financially responsible. If that isn’t enough, he also created a non-profit, Credit Abuse Resistance Education (CARE), to bring bankruptcy professionals into classrooms throughout the U.S. to share their experiences. Storytelling has an important place in the personal finance classroom (it is personal after all!) and John’s years on the bench in western New York provide him with lots of material to share about the causes of financial distress. In this podcast, you will also hear from the CARE team of Anna Flores and Ian Redman about how you can bring CARE to your classroom. Enjoy!

Details:

What Do Students Know About Financial Aid?

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Catching up on some reading over this break. Enjoying Sarah Goldrick-Rab’s Paying the Price which tracks six students in Wisconsin over six years and chronicles their triumphs and struggles in finding their way through college. She had a chart on page 56 that I found informative in highlighting what students know and don’t know about financial aid.

Here’s what the 2,100 students participating in the Wisconsin Scholars Longitudinal Study (WSLS) who answered their first-year survey knew about financial aid (number is parens is percentage who responded correctly):

By |December 19th, 2016|Case Study, Paying for College, Research, Student Loans|

NGPF Podcast: Tim Talks With “Rock Star” Educator Brian Page of Reading High School (OH)

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What does an extraordinary educator do during their one-year sabbatical away from the classroom? If you are Brian Page, star educator at Reading High School in Ohio, the answer is “a lot of things.” In his return visit to the NGPF podcast, Brian shares how he spent his year away from his beloved classroom. You will learn why he has come back to the classroom even more energized (which, for those of you who know Brian, is saying something) and eager to implement new ideas to engage his students. I encourage you to keep up with Brian on his Twitter feed @FinEdChat. Enjoy!

Details:

  • 0:00~2:25 – Introduction
  • 2:25~4:05 – Brian’s role at Budget Challenge
  • 4:05~8:57 – Instructional design/lessons
  • 8:57~10:13 – Finding scholarships
  • 10:13~11:55 – His creative process
  • 11:55~15:59 – A week in Brian’s class
  • 15:59~18:03 – Explaining the FAFSA
  • 18:03~

NGPF Podcast: Tim Talks to Jonathan Clements About His Latest Book “How To Think About Money”

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I enjoyed catching up with Jonathan Clements recently on the NGPF podcast. Since our conversation a year ago, Jonathan has been busy on a number of projects including teaching a college course in personal finance and writing a book “How To Think About Money” (good choice for a stocking stuffer this holiday season:). His goal with the book is to provide “a coherent way to think about their finances, so they worry less about money, make smarter financial choices and squeeze more happiness out of the dollars that they have.” I always come away from a conversation with Jonathan thinking more deeply about my relationship with money along with some ideas that I can implement in my life. I hope that you will too! Enjoy!

Question: What Percentage of High School Graduates File the FAFSA To Access College Aid?

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Answer: 44% for the class of 2014 (and 48% for students in the largest US cities).

From National College Access Network:

Does 48 percent sound low to you? It sure does to us, since we know that many of these cities have high proportions of low-income students who will qualify for grant aid for college and who need financial help the most. But when we crunched the national numbers for the class of 2014 (the most recent available), we found that the national FAFSA completion rate for high school graduates was just 44 percent.

Why is this important?

By |December 1st, 2016|Current Events, Paying for College, Question of the Day, Research|

NGPF Visits City-As-School (New York, NY)

NGPF Fellow Tony Montgomery not only co-facilitated our workshop at the w!se MoneyPOWER conference on November 8, AND helped field teacher questions at our Exhibitor’s Booth, but he ALSO invited me to visit his classroom the following day, Nov 9, at City-As-School in Manhattan.

I visited Tony’s class which, this cycle, is focused on Paying for College. The school calendar is organized into cycles, where students learn intensely in one narrowly focused class, rather than having many units spread over a semester. Tony uses our curriculum, on the Gooru platform, as the main content for his class, supplementing with his own resources, too. Speaking of, check out these two recommended articles from Tony: Is College Tuition Really Too High? (NY Times) and Career Earnings of Low-income Graduates Lag, Study Says (Chicago Tribune).

Anyway, back to the visit — While I was there, Tony’s students were on their second to last class period, and they were researching the net price of three different colleges of their choosing. Tony slightly modified this NGPF activity, which the students worked on independently: CALCULATE: How Much Should I Borrow for College. I was really impressed with how well his students navigated the

Two Charts That Prove We Need To Teach Financial Aid in HIGH SCHOOL!

From GFLEC Policy Brief on Student Loans:

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NGPF Podcast: Tim Talks to Ami Amero, A Financial Literacy Mainiac

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Thanks to Ami for joining me on the NGPF podcast for the second time (we had to scrap the first one due to a bug in the recording software). No, that’s not a typo in the title but rather a play on Ami’s home state of Maine. Ami teaches at a small school (listen to hear how small the school is), Forest Hills Consolidated in Jackman, and is passionate about getting more financial education to Maine students. She shares the thought process that went into designing her course, how she teaches about careers beyond Jackman and how she implements her favorite project, which students still talk about years later. Enjoy!

Details:

  • 0:00~1:21 – Intro
  • 1:21~2:03 – Where Ami teaches
  • 2:03~8:20 – What motivated Ami to create a personal finance course
  • 8:20~11:56 – Top three lessons Ami wants to teach her students
  • 11:56~14:38 – How she uses the book “The Millionaire Next Door”
  • 14:38~16:31 – Importance of