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Thirty (30!) Spanish Activities Now Available

In case you missed it in January, NGPF has heard the call, and we’re beginning to translate our original activities and projects into Spanish for use with your English Language Learners. Don’t worry — we’re not relying on my own poor command of the Spanish language (muy malo) — we’ve hired an awesome translator who is working through our resources in batches of 10. With two batches now complete, we’ve got 30 activities/projects across Checking, Saving, Budgeting, Types of Credit, Managing Credit, and Investing, ready for use!

How to access the Spanish translations (3 methods):

  1. Bookmark this directory page for links directly to the Spanish and corresponding English versions of the Google docs
  2. On our website, look for activities and projects with (Sp) following their title — that denotes the resource is available in Spanish  Spanish screenshot
  3. On individual activities or projects, look for the words Spanish Version under the header and click to open the translation.   Spanish version

 

Are Spanish translations going to be a game changer in your classroom? Can you just not wait for us to release more?

New Curriculum: Our 8-Hour Workshop!

Asked to teach a 7-hour course at Castilleja School in Palo Alto, we polled the seniors at this high performing all-girls school to find out what personal finance topics they most wanted to learn, and they came back with:

  • How to budget during college and/or grad school
  • Understanding how credit cards and loans work
  • Buying a car
  • And how to invest

We rounded out their 5-class course with an hour on credit scores and, after working with the students, realized they also had a lot of questions about taxes. So, we turned our awesome Casti course into an 8-Hour Workshop to share with you.

Here are a few quick reasons I love this workshop:

  • It’s perfect if you don’t have a full semester course on Personal Finance. You can use part or all of the 8 hours in a senior seminar, an advisory, an after-school program, an intersession course, etc. Or, the individual lessons may be JUST what you’re looking to add into your full Fin Lit course.
  • It inspired us to create two new activities:
    • A whole-class, up-out-of-your-seats way to teach mutual and index funds (thanks, NGPF Fellow Andrea Stemper for the inspiration)
    • A new spin on our
By |March 6th, 2017|New Products, Personal Finance, Teaching Strategies|

Time Launches Coinage, A Video-First Site Dedicated To Personal Finance

From Press Release:

Today, Time Inc. (NYSE:TIME) launches Coinage, a new video-first brand covering personal finance that runs across 22 Time Inc. sites. Coinage will feature 600 short-form videos throughout 2017 to help guide everyday choices consumers make in spending, saving and investing for themselves and their families across all stages of life in a lighthearted and entertaining fashion.

Here are the first three videos they released. Each are between 1-2 minutes:

Earn DonorsChoose Credits For Teaching Your Students Essential Financial Skills

Next Gen Personal Finance (NGPF) is committed to expanding access to high quality personal finance educational content. Through our partnership with DonorsChoose.org, we will be bringing our engaging and easy to implement activities to thousands of classrooms. We know that you understand the importance of financial literacy, so we developed a list of our most popular resources for you to use with your students (see list below). To thank you for bringing this gift of financial literacy to your class, we are offering DonorsChoose.org funding credits which you can apply to a classroom project of your choosing. All teachers who work with students in grades 9-12 are eligible for this rewards program. 

Three Steps Is All It Takes!

  1. Sign up for the Next Gen Personal Finance program. We only have 2,500 spaces available so be sure to sign up ASAP.
    • We’ll close the signup form and update this page once all the slots have been filled, so rest assured that if you’re able to sign up, spaces are still available. 

NGPF is always at the ready…

You know we here at NGPF are always happy to help, which is why we didn’t think twice about responding to a unique email we received through our website. Dorothy was trying to solve a problem involving her church group: It’s got members who have joined at various points, anywhere from the past year to being a charter, founding member of the organization. They wanted to buy funeral flowers, as the members pass away, at varying price points based on length of membership. Dorothy turned to NGPF for a solution for keeping account of these flower purchases.

Now, this is not typically the type of support NGPF is in the business of offering, but, as mentioned before, we love to help! So, I created a quick spreadsheet so that Dorothy and her group can track their funeral flower spending. I love spreadsheets, so it was a perfect project for a Friday morning!

And, it ties in nicely to a little teaser promo here — NGPF surveyed earlier this year about spreadsheet usage in your classrooms, and we’ve identified it as an area where teens (and some teachers) could use a little support. That’s why one of our focuses for Spring semester will

By |December 13th, 2016|Excel activities, New Products|

What’s Changed in Personal Finance Since 2001?

I received an email from a personal finance curriculum in my inbox this morning (nothing unusual here, I get a lot of them:). The provider was encouraging their educators to update their curriculum since they had heard some were still using their 2001 edition (Remember Friends? That was the top TV show in 2001). Yikes! Quick digression, ok, let’s call it a commercial: Since NGPF makes all of its content available online, we make real-time updates when circumstances change, such as when the FAFSA becomes available three months earlier.

I thought it would be interesting to think about how the financial services industry has changed since 2001. In other words, what are students missing if they are being taught from a 2001 edition?

Future of Retail: The Supermarket May Never Be the Same Again!

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This image on the right may become a thing of the past if Amazon has their way! But first, I must digress…

For those who have listened to my podcast or read my blog, you probably know about the first stock I purchased in the fall of 1989. I took a few hundred dollars from my first paycheck and walked on down to the Quick and Reilly brokerage office in Boston and set up an account (the concept of online trading still about five years away). Thirty minutes later, I had my 100 shares of a company called CheckRobot in my account (and the riches were going to flow). Their innovation: automated checkout lines. Customers would skip the checkout line and be able to scan their own items and take their groceries and their receipt and pay at a centralized pay station. Customers would love it, companies would love the labor-saving aspect of it (one clerk for 5 checkout lines) and orders would flow in…well that’s not how it happened. Adoption was slow to non-existent, the company ran low on funds and was forced into a merger where shareholders got very little:( I got a valuable lesson in risk.

Interactive: Grappling With The Ethics of Self-Driving Cars

Skimming this FT article about Apple’s efforts in the autonomous vehicle market, I was intrigued with the introduction of ethics into the conversation:

Apple urges the regulator to continue “thoughtful exploration of the ethical issues” of self-driving cars.

“Because automated vehicles promise such a broad and deep human impact, companies should consider the ethical dimensions of them in comparably broad and deep terms,” Apple writes. These considerations include privacy, how the cars’ software systems make decisions and the impact on employment and public spaces, it says.

As the technology gets closer to adoption, I expect the focus will shift to the ethical implications, especially this idea of how the software systems will make decisions. Which makes this next resource so engaging. Here is a fascinating interactive developed by the MIT Media Lab which forces students to grapple with these ethical issues. The 45 second video above explains the simulation in greater detail (440,000 views after just three months!):

Mini-Activity: