Investing

/Investing
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Chart: How Have World Stock Markets Changed Over The Past 100 Years?

Interesting graphic from a Credit Suisse report comparing the relative size of stock markets in 1899 vs. 2016 (great for a history course):

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Questions to ask:

Snapchat Is Going Public. Would You Buy Their IPO?

First an admission. I have never used Snapchat. Despite that, I thought their upcoming IPO would be a good hook to get students interested in how the stock market works. Before diving into the specifics of Snapchat (actually it is their parent company, SNAP, who is going public), here’s a good video from Wall Street Survivor that explains what an IPO is:

Questions:

NGPF Podcast: Tim Talks to FinLit Mover and Shaker Brett Burkey

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He’s written personal finance workbooks, successfully lobbied Florida legislators, trained hundreds of teachers and taught thousands of students in his career. Oh, he also was a pioneer in bringing a blended learning model into his classroom. Who’s “he”? That would be educator Brett Burkey who took time to appear on the NGPF podcast to share insights from his incredible career. From the statehouse to the classroom, Brett describes how he was able to engage his audience to bring about change. Enjoy!
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NGPF Podcast: Tim Talks to NGPF Fellow Charles Kafoglis About His Four Principles to Teaching Personal Finance

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Thanks to Charles Kafoglis of Incarnate Word in Houston, Texas for sharing his insights recently on the NGPF podcast. I got to know Charles through his participation in our Summer Institute in 2016. I saw firsthand his passion for financial education and have enjoyed our ongoing dialogue about different approaches to teaching investing. In this podcast, Charles shares the four key principles that serve as the foundation for his personal finance course as well as how his course ties into the leadership program at his high school. Finally, he will share how he sets the tone for his course early in the semester and the resources he relies upon to do that. Enjoy!

Details:

Having Fun With Investing Cartoons

Here are three cartoons focused on investing and a few questions for your students to ponder:

  • What is happening in the cartoon?
  • What is the motive of the cartoonist?
  • What lessons can you glean from these cartoons to help your financial life?

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In this case, the experts are right! Check out this NGPF Activity on Compound Interest. Create an activity to see what happens when parents invest in college saving or 529 plans when their children are born. 

By |February 15th, 2017|Cartoons, Investing, Mutual Funds, Teaching Strategies|

Ways To Make Investing Simpler

I have been thinking a lot about this issue of how to make investing simpler. I hear from teachers that this is a real pain point for them. I can see in the NGPF podcast stats that the most popular guests tend to be conversations about investing (Mike Finley, Jonathan Clements and Vanguard’s Jim Rowley to name a few). Then this weekend the lightbulb went off. I was heading to the coast listening to Charlie Ellis on the Masters In Business podcast (kinda dorky I know). Those of you not familiar with Charlie Ellis, he is probably the best investment management thinker you have never heard of. Charlie has played a role in two of the juggernauts of modern day investing, the Yale endowment and Vanguard Investments (the king of indexers just crossed $4 billion (I mean TRILLION!)). Oh, and he was an early investor in Berkshire Hathaway too (Warren Buffett’s company)!

Who’s the Fiduciary: The Butcher or The Nutritionist?

Opened the Saturday paper in search of good blog material and Ron Lieber of NY Times comes through again in his latest column “Pepper a Financial Adviser with Questions About Fees.” Fiduciary is a word being tossed around lots these days when it comes to the relationship between a financial advisor and their clients. It might surprise a lot of people that in the current regulatory environment, a financial advisor is NOT required to act in their clients’ best interest (hmmm…surprised?). This fiduciary standard (to act in best interests of your client) was about to be applied to advisors providing retirement investment advice but the new Administration appears keen on delaying this, according to CNBC.

By |February 13th, 2017|Article, Behavioral Finance, Current Events, Investing, Video Resource|

What’s Trending on the NGPF Blog?

Here are the top 5 posts from January:

  1. Question: How Much Does It Cost To Raise a Child Born in 2015?
  2. Chart: How Does the Typical American Household Spend Their Money (and How Has It Changed Over Time)?
  3. Videos: 4 Simple Rules of Investing from Marginal Revolution University
  4. Videos: What Was Considered Good Financial Advice in the 1940s and 1950s?
  5. Chart: How Strong Are Americans Problem-Solving Skills Using a Computer?

We saw the popularity of #1 (it was 3X more popular than #2) and created a Question of the Day so educators could use it to engage their students. This is a great example of how we use the research that goes into writing daily blog posts to inform our curriculum to ensure that we stay relevant and current. The Marginal Revolution University videos (#3) are a new source that I came across during my travels to Rhode Island in December. I will be reviewing more of those in the weeks ahead.

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By |February 9th, 2017|Budgeting, Career, Chart of the Week, Investing, Video Resource|