Interactive

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Interactive: Which Tech Giant Would You Drop?

Here’s a fun and quick interactive from NY Times to get your students thinking about the pervasiveness of technology companies in their lives. Students are forced to rank order the importance of the top five tech companies in their lives by selecting the order by which they would give them up (if forced by an evil monarch:) The five companies: Alphabet (Google is one of their subsidiaries), Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Microsoft (interesting that three start with the letter “A”).

Questions:

Interactive: How Did The U.S. Government Spend A Few Trillion Dollars In FY2016?

I thought Econ teachers might like this interactive website. Steve Ballmer, former Microsoft CEO and owner of the L.A. Clippers (A $2 billion purchase) has done a public service by harmonizing data from federal, state and local governments and putting it all on a website, USA Spending.gov (note that this interactive may move here this summer).

So, how did the federal government spend $3.85 trillion in FY2016? Note that on the website, you can scroll your mouse over the individual elements to get additional information.

By |May 11th, 2017|Budgeting, Chart of the Week, Interactive|

Interactive: How Does Your Disposable Income Compare to Peers in Other Countries?

From the Guardian comes an interesting interactive which displays long-term trends in disposable income among different age groups in different countries. Students start by entering an age and a country (all G-8 countries are represented) and then see a series of charts that show three different analyses:

Interactive: How Can I Retire Early?

As an educator, I often get this question from students. Yes, I know they have attention spans that are minute to minute (or text to text) but when the subject of retirement comes up, they usually fixate on “How can I get there as soon as possible?”

What I love about this post from Mr. Money Moustache (last seen on this blog in 2014), is the simplicity of his answer and how it all comes down to ONE factor: 

Interactive Chart: Which Careers Are The Biggest Gamble?

Hat tip to Of Dollars and Data blog (great content for math educators!) for posting this chart (see the interactive version of the chart from plotly):

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First, a little orientation: The X axis is hourly median wage for a given career and the Y axis is the differential in wages between the 10th and 75th percentile. So what the graph is telling us is that the careers that have the highest values on the Y axis have the highest percentage increase in wages between top (75th percentile) and bottom performers (10th percentile). As displayed on the graph, most of the high Y-axis values align with jobs in the entertainment business. For example, to take one job, Actor, you can see the hourly median wage is about $20 and the wage percentage increase between the 10th and 75th percentile is over 400%.

Have some fun with this graph by going to the interactive version here where your students can scroll over and find what career aligns with a given plot on the graph. Here are some questions:

  • What 4-5 jobs have the lowest amount of wage dispersion between top

Interactive: What Are Your Odds Of Winning the Lottery?

Great simulation from LA Times allows you to play multiple iterations of the PowerBall lottery to see how even small wins can’t hide the fact that ultimately you will LOSE!

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Here’s how it works: 

Interactive: What Do Consumers Spend Their Money On?

If you are a data geek, you will love this interactive tool/data visualization from Flowing Data (be sure to click on the link to take advantage of the interactive nature of the tool):

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Let me provide some context for what you are looking at. Here are the data sources:

Interactive: What Do Americans Earn Per Hour?

Simple interactive from CNN shows the percentage of jobs at a given wage range and as you rollover a given wage band you see a list of representative jobs with their hourly wage and annual salary (note that data is from May 2013 from Bureau of Labor Statistics):

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Questions for students:

By |March 23rd, 2017|Career, Current Events, Interactive, Question of the Day, Research|