Interactive

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NGPF Product Launch: NGPF Releases Revamped Savings Unit

I am so proud of the NGPF team (Jessica, Sonia, Laura, Ren, Sid and Niko) that has worked feverishly to deliver a revamped Saving Unit that we released tonight. Why do we continue to revamp our lessons? The short answer can be found in our culture of continuous improvement as we are always looking for ways to make our lessons stronger (your feedback is critical in this process). Here is the longer answer: 

Interactive: Grappling With The Ethics of Self-Driving Cars

Skimming this FT article about Apple’s efforts in the autonomous vehicle market, I was intrigued with the introduction of ethics into the conversation:

Apple urges the regulator to continue “thoughtful exploration of the ethical issues” of self-driving cars.

“Because automated vehicles promise such a broad and deep human impact, companies should consider the ethical dimensions of them in comparably broad and deep terms,” Apple writes. These considerations include privacy, how the cars’ software systems make decisions and the impact on employment and public spaces, it says.

As the technology gets closer to adoption, I expect the focus will shift to the ethical implications, especially this idea of how the software systems will make decisions. Which makes this next resource so engaging. Here is a fascinating interactive developed by the MIT Media Lab which forces students to grapple with these ethical issues. The 45 second video above explains the simulation in greater detail (440,000 views after just three months!):

Mini-Activity:

Interactive: What’s Your Leadership Style?

Plug this interactive into your Career or Leadership lesson and spark a great conversation about leadership styles. Students can complete this simple nine question survey from Quartz and determine what their leadership style is. Here’s a sampling of the statements (or questions) that students will respond to:

Question: How Much Income Does A Household Need To Be In Top 1%?

A good interactive from CNN to stimulate discussion in your classroom and infuse some math too (hat tip to a teacher at JumpStart National Conference who pointed this out to me; sorry that I didn’t catch his name:). As you move the slider bar on the left, the point of the graph moves up to show the percentile ranking:

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  • Questions:

Interactive: How Long Are You Going to Live?

Nice question to get your students engaged in your lesson about saving for retirement. Here’s an interactive from the Actuaries Longevity Illustrator to help answer that question. I created two fictitious high school students, Bill Bradley and Samantha Taggart to demonstrate a potential mini-activity:

Activity: How A Commercial Delivery Demonstrates A Changing Jobs Landscape

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Here’s an interesting mini-activity/webquest to do in your Careers Unit. We all know that the economy today is not the same economy that our parents entered when they completed their education. Columnist Tom Friedman is fond of saying that your parent’s generation “got a job” but millenials increasingly need to be able to “create their own job.” Reading the headlines we get constant reminders of the rapid pace of change.

Here is the NY Times headline and lede that caught my attention today: Self Driving Truck’s First Mission: Beer Run:

The futurists of Silicon Valley may not have seen this one coming: The first commercial delivery made by a self-driving truck was 2,000 cases of Budweiser beer. On Tuesday, Otto, the Uber-owned self-driving vehicle operation, announced the completion of its first commercial delivery, having delivered its beer load from Fort Collins, Colo., to Colorado Springs, a roughly 120-mile trip on Interstate 25.

Combine this article with this map of the most common jobs by state (spoiler alert: for most, its a truck driver) and you get a sense for the massive dislocation that very well may occur in this blue-collar field in the years ahead. Yet, this is just one example of automation coming to a job near you.

So, how can we translate this into an activity for your students that gives them an action plan?

Interactive: What Happened To the Middle Class?

GIF courtesy of the Financial Times (article is worth a read too) shows how the middle class has changed over time. It is now less than 1/2 of the households in America:

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Questions for your students:

You Won’t Think of Unemployment Data The Same Way Again!

From Flowing data (via Big Picture Blog) comes a one minute video with a time-lapsed color coded map of the US highlighting trends in unemployment rates from 1990 – 2016:

Questions for students: