Interactive

/Interactive
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Interactive: What Do Americans Earn Per Hour?

Simple interactive from CNN shows the percentage of jobs at a given wage range and as you rollover a given wage band you see a list of representative jobs with their hourly wage and annual salary (note that data is from May 2013 from Bureau of Labor Statistics):

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Questions for students:

By |March 23rd, 2017|Career, Current Events, Interactive, Question of the Day, Research|

Interactive: What’s the S&P500?

Here’s a great interactive for students who struggle with the concept of the S&P500 or of an index or mutual fund. For a math teacher, this interactive would be percentage heaven! I blogged about this in October 2014 when most of you were NOT reading this blog so definitely worthy of a repeat post. I have added better questions for your students to answer too. From finviz.com comes this great visualization of the S&P500:

Here’s a description of what you are looking at:

Interactive: How Much Have Incomes Changed for Specific Jobs Over the Past 50 Years?

Interesting interactive from Flowing Data demonstrating how income in various occupational categories has changed since 1960. Here’s what income distribution looked like in 1960 for several occupations (more occupations included on the website):

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Student can click on the SELECT YEAR button and see how these income distributions change over time.

Questions for your students (be sure they go to the interactive to answer the questions):

By |February 8th, 2017|Career, Chart of the Week, Interactive, Question of the Day, Research|

NGPF Product Launch: NGPF Releases Revamped Savings Unit

I am so proud of the NGPF team (Jessica, Sonia, Laura, Ren, Sid and Niko) that has worked feverishly to deliver a revamped Saving Unit that we released tonight. Why do we continue to revamp our lessons? The short answer can be found in our culture of continuous improvement as we are always looking for ways to make our lessons stronger (your feedback is critical in this process). Here is the longer answer: 

Interactive: Grappling With The Ethics of Self-Driving Cars

Skimming this FT article about Apple’s efforts in the autonomous vehicle market, I was intrigued with the introduction of ethics into the conversation:

Apple urges the regulator to continue “thoughtful exploration of the ethical issues” of self-driving cars.

“Because automated vehicles promise such a broad and deep human impact, companies should consider the ethical dimensions of them in comparably broad and deep terms,” Apple writes. These considerations include privacy, how the cars’ software systems make decisions and the impact on employment and public spaces, it says.

As the technology gets closer to adoption, I expect the focus will shift to the ethical implications, especially this idea of how the software systems will make decisions. Which makes this next resource so engaging. Here is a fascinating interactive developed by the MIT Media Lab which forces students to grapple with these ethical issues. The 45 second video above explains the simulation in greater detail (440,000 views after just three months!):

Mini-Activity:

Interactive: What’s Your Leadership Style?

Plug this interactive into your Career or Leadership lesson and spark a great conversation about leadership styles. Students can complete this simple nine question survey from Quartz and determine what their leadership style is. Here’s a sampling of the statements (or questions) that students will respond to:

Question: How Much Income Does A Household Need To Be In Top 1%?

A good interactive from CNN to stimulate discussion in your classroom and infuse some math too (hat tip to a teacher at JumpStart National Conference who pointed this out to me; sorry that I didn’t catch his name:). As you move the slider bar on the left, the point of the graph moves up to show the percentile ranking:

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  • Questions:

Interactive: How Long Are You Going to Live?

Nice question to get your students engaged in your lesson about saving for retirement. Here’s an interactive from the Actuaries Longevity Illustrator to help answer that question. I created two fictitious high school students, Bill Bradley and Samantha Taggart to demonstrate a potential mini-activity: