Financial Literacy

/Financial Literacy
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A Day In The Life of The NGPF Website

By now, you realize that I am a data geek, so it would only seem natural that I obsess over our website statistics and the story it tells about how educators, students, parents and others who stumble across our website use us. Please note that we don’t track individual users on our site and get our aggregate data from Google Analytics, a web analytics service provided by Google.

I thought I would choose a day from last week. How about Wednesday, March 29th? Here is what I can tell you about that day:

By |April 9th, 2017|Current Events, Financial Literacy|

NGPF Featured as Key Resource in Right About Money

Thanks to Brian Page for featuring us as a key resource on Dan Kadlec’s Right About Money media platform focused on financial literacy.

I appreciated how Brian described the multitude of ways that he uses NGPF resources and content:

T-2 Days…NGPF Has Contests, PD, Resource Ideas Planned for Financial Literacy Month

With Financial Literacy Month (#FLM2017, #FinLit, #afinlitfuture) right around the corner, we wanted to share with you our plans! NGPF has a full slate of activity planned for the month of April with contests, PD opportunities and resources that you won’t want to miss.

Get A Sneak Peak at NGPF’s One-Semester Course; Register for our April 25th Webinar

We hear it all the time — “Your website has SO many great resources, I don’t know where to start.” Or, “There’s no way I could teach all of your units in my one-semester course; how do I choose?” We’ve heard your requests and are excited to launch our One-Semester Course! Join us on Tuesday, April 25, as we unveil this new Course Map. Register today!

Attend this webinar and you WILL:

Laura’s Insights: NGPF in the Classroom!

This year, NGPF took our show on the road and taught personal finance workshops in several local schools.  These experiences included a 3 day workshop at the Nueva School (San Mateo), a four session workshop at Castilleja school (Palo Alto), seven sessions with an AVID classroom at Mountain View High School (Mountain View) and our intensive 6 week workshop at Eastside Prep (East Palo Alto). In this post, I will share my experiences at the Castilleja School, an all-girls school just down the road from our office.

Given the time constraints (only 4 sessions), I modified our recently released 8-Hour Workshop and focused on Paying for & Budgeting During College, Understanding Debt & Credit, Why Credit Scores Matter and finishing with a Crash Course in Investing.

In each of the sessions, the girls engaged with the content and asked many great questions. Here were some of my highlights:

Resource Lists for Financial Educators (courtesy of Barbara O’Neill of Rutgers Cooperative Extension)

What does a distinguished professor do during her sabbatical? Curate personal finance resources, of course! In this blog post, Barbara O’Neill shares the fruits of her hundreds of hours of labor in putting together three awesome resource lists (see bottom of post for links to her lists), including what what she considered the “best of the best” from the NGPF library. As she describes below, the purpose of her odyssey was to replenish her “well” of creative learning activities. I hope that your “well” overflows as you find resources that will work in your classroom. Thank you Barbara for this tremendous gift to the community! Your commitment and dedication to improving financial literacy in this country inspires us.

Wrong Question: Should College Students Be Required to Take A Personal Finance Course?

Kudos to WSJ for asking the question and getting opposing viewpoints on the answer to the question. I am having trouble containing myself so I thought I better get my thoughts down on paper before I explode. First, the newspaper is asking the wrong question. The right question is “Should High School Students Be Required to Take A Personal Finance Course?” College is too late. The biggest financial decision that young people make occurs BEFORE college. Those decisions are “where are they going to continue their education?” and “how are they going to pay for it.” I received way too many calls in my days at Student Lending Analytics from sobbing students and their parents about their predicament of high debt and “I am only a junior.” As we know student debt has a long tail to it and has ramifications far into the future. It is that much harder to course correct several years into one’s college career. 

NGPF Podcast: Tim Talks to Retired Bankruptcy Judge John Ninfo About His Passion For Financial Literacy

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What does a retired bankruptcy judge do to fill his “golden years?” If you are Hon. John Ninfo, you write a weekly column and visit hundreds of classrooms in upstate New York to teach young people about what it means to be financially responsible. If that isn’t enough, he also created a non-profit, Credit Abuse Resistance Education (CARE), to bring bankruptcy professionals into classrooms throughout the U.S. to share their experiences. Storytelling has an important place in the personal finance classroom (it is personal after all!) and John’s years on the bench in western New York provide him with lots of material to share about the causes of financial distress. In this podcast, you will also hear from the CARE team of Anna Flores and Ian Redman about how you can bring CARE to your classroom. Enjoy!

Details:

Do your students know more about money than a 29-year-old?

I meant to strike while the iron was hot, while this NY Times article, I’m 29 and I never learned how money works. It’s time to fix that., was all over my social media feed in mid-October. Whelp — It’s 7 weeks later, and here I am. Better late than never I suppose (that’s why Tim is the master blogger around NGPF, not me).

I like that the article exists, but I don’t like the idea of just giving it to my (hypothetical) students to read. It covers FAR too many topics in too much detail to be a concentrated “intro to personal finance,” and it seems silly to have your students read and take notes on it if they’ve never learned any of this stuff before (how will they even know what is “important?) or if they’ve learned it all before (why are they taking notes if they already know all this?). So, what would picky Jessica do with this awesome article? Here are a few of my ideas:

  1. Pull out the questions (sometimes they have follow-up questions embedded), and use it as a pre-test at the beginning of the term and a post-test at the end. Of