Current Events

/Current Events
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Chart: How Have World Stock Markets Changed Over The Past 100 Years?

Interesting graphic from a Credit Suisse report comparing the relative size of stock markets in 1899 vs. 2016 (great for a history course):

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Questions to ask:

Question: Who Has The Best Cell Phone Plan?

We know your students love their smartphones. How about putting that obsession to use by having them read this article from the NY Times “Picking a New Phone Plan? Here Are Your Best Bets?” As the article notes, every few months the carriers update their pricing models (check out our earlier posts on the topic here and here):

Shopping for a phone plan can be as daunting as picking a health insurance package. The rates and options constantly change, and it feels impossible to make simple comparisons between carriers. Case in point: The best phone plans we recommended a year and a half ago are now obsolete because the wireless carriers have completely changed their offerings.

The article goes on to highlight the “best plans” for different types of users: Single User, Single Power User, Average Couple, Power Couple, Family of Four, Occasional Traveler. Here are some ideas on how you can structure this as an activity for students to discuss with their parents or guardians (copied from an earlier post):

How Is The New FAFSA Timetable Impacting College Offers?

I was wondering about this question. so was happy to see this article in the WSJ last week (subscription). Our post last September described two of the major changes to the FAFSA. First, families could now complete the FAFSA starting October 1st (previous deadline was January 1st). Secondly, the financial information provided on the FAFSA now will come from prior prior (not a typo) year’s tax return. Let me explain. Those families completing the FAFSA in October 2016 for the 2017-18 school year, data from their 2015 tax year would be used.

The most dramatic impact is that students should expect to receive offer letters from colleges SOONER with about 50% of colleges expecting to send their need-based offers sooner. Here’s the data:

Snapchat Is Going Public. Would You Buy Their IPO?

First an admission. I have never used Snapchat. Despite that, I thought their upcoming IPO would be a good hook to get students interested in how the stock market works. Before diving into the specifics of Snapchat (actually it is their parent company, SNAP, who is going public), here’s a good video from Wall Street Survivor that explains what an IPO is:

Questions:

NGPF Podcast: Tim Talks to FinLit Mover and Shaker Brett Burkey

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He’s written personal finance workbooks, successfully lobbied Florida legislators, trained hundreds of teachers and taught thousands of students in his career. Oh, he also was a pioneer in bringing a blended learning model into his classroom. Who’s “he”? That would be educator Brett Burkey who took time to appear on the NGPF podcast to share insights from his incredible career. From the statehouse to the classroom, Brett describes how he was able to engage his audience to bring about change. Enjoy!
Details: 

What’s the Catch?: Purchase 3 Bureau Reports

I saw this paid ad during a Google Search this evening:

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Hmmm…so what caught my eye? The “Purchase 3 Bureau Reports.” Many of you are probably wondering “Why purchase these reports when you can get credit reports from each of the three bureaus for FREE at annualcreditreport.com? ” and “Why would you want to buy them at the same time?” A best practice is to space out your FREE credit reports from the three credit bureaus every four months so you can be constantly monitoring them. To make matters even more confusing (or some might say misleading) the ad says in bold at the top “No Credit Card Needed” so why would I have to purchase something that is available for FREE elsewhere.

Click on “Purchase 3 Bureau Reports” and here’s what you get:

By |February 14th, 2017|Advertising, Credit Reports, Credit Scores, Current Events|

Question: In What Year Was The First A.T.M. Installed (And Other Fun Facts About Banking)?

Answer: 1969.

Good opener to this 1,000 word article (about 5 minutes reading time) on the history of banking from NerdWallet. Here are a few interesting points (some of which I even remember!):

By |February 13th, 2017|Article, Checking Accounts, Current Events, Question of the Day|

Who’s the Fiduciary: The Butcher or The Nutritionist?

Opened the Saturday paper in search of good blog material and Ron Lieber of NY Times comes through again in his latest column “Pepper a Financial Adviser with Questions About Fees.” Fiduciary is a word being tossed around lots these days when it comes to the relationship between a financial advisor and their clients. It might surprise a lot of people that in the current regulatory environment, a financial advisor is NOT required to act in their clients’ best interest (hmmm…surprised?). This fiduciary standard (to act in best interests of your client) was about to be applied to advisors providing retirement investment advice but the new Administration appears keen on delaying this, according to CNBC.

By |February 13th, 2017|Article, Behavioral Finance, Current Events, Investing, Video Resource|