Activities

/Activities
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Interactive: Which Tech Giant Would You Drop?

Here’s a fun and quick interactive from NY Times to get your students thinking about the pervasiveness of technology companies in their lives. Students are forced to rank order the importance of the top five tech companies in their lives by selecting the order by which they would give them up (if forced by an evil monarch:) The five companies: Alphabet (Google is one of their subsidiaries), Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Microsoft (interesting that three start with the letter “A”).

Questions:

Writer’s Workshop: Write A Letter To A CEO (And Get A Response)

A recent Ron Lieber column in NY Times got me thinking about a useful skill that all young people should have: how to advocate for oneself in a manner that people in power will respond to.

Here’s the crux of his column:

Press Release: Announcing 2017 Next Gen Personal Finance Teacher Innovator Award Winners

Palo Alto, CA –May 2, 2017 — Next Gen Personal Finance (NGPF), a non-profit with a mission to provide a free personal finance education to all young people, is pleased to announce the winners of the Third Annual NGPF Teacher Innovator Award.  This award recognizes outstanding teachers who have developed their own projects and activities to engage and educate their students. NGPF received dozens of innovative and creative project submissions from high school and college educators. These projects were judged based on their creativity, the skills they developed and the ease with which other teachers could implement them in their own classrooms. 

Each of the winners of the 2017 NGPF Teacher Innovator Award will be receiving $1,000 from NGPF and will appear in an upcoming NGPF podcast to discuss their projects:

  • Tara Kelley, Personal Finance Educator at Harwood Union High School in Duxbury, Vermont, submitted “Spring Break Project” which allows students to explore the cost of using a credit card to pay for their Spring Break vacation. They learn through this exercise the impact that changing their monthly credit card payments has on the total interest paid.
  • Jesse Peterkin, a Personal Finance Educator at Ridgefield High School in Ridgefield, Connecticut, uses celebrities and avatars as hooks to engage students

Interactive: How Can I Retire Early?

As an educator, I often get this question from students. Yes, I know they have attention spans that are minute to minute (or text to text) but when the subject of retirement comes up, they usually fixate on “How can I get there as soon as possible?”

What I love about this post from Mr. Money Moustache (last seen on this blog in 2014), is the simplicity of his answer and how it all comes down to ONE factor: 

NGPF Podcast: Tim Talks To Co-Creator of “Spent” Game, Jenny Nicholson

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I first heard about the game Spent from podcast guest, Helaine Olen. She described it as one of the best simulations in how it immersed the player into what it feels like to live “paycheck to paycheck.” After playing the game in our offices, we agreed with her, wrapped an activity around it with discussion questions and added it to our Interactive Library. Teachers are glad we did since we are constantly getting feedback like this about the impact of the game on students:

Activity Idea: Personal Finance In My Life

My travels took me to Chicago and New York recently and here are some images related to personal finance that I captured:

  • Thanks to the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago for recently co-hosting the Financial Literacy Summit with VISA. I enjoyed moderating the panel on Expanding Access to Financial Education Programs (video for Session 6  here):

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  • Would you take tax advice from a “tax truck?” Seen on the streets of New York the weekend before Tax Day:

Question: What Is the Largest Company Headquartered in Each State?

I thought that business teachers would get enjoy getting students to guess the answer for their specific state. Also will teach an important lesson about the various ways to measure the size of corporations. Here is the infographic with the largest company in each state based on number of employees (with hat tip to Visual Capitalist): 

Interactive: What Do Consumers Spend Their Money On?

If you are a data geek, you will love this interactive tool/data visualization from Flowing Data (be sure to click on the link to take advantage of the interactive nature of the tool):

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Let me provide some context for what you are looking at. Here are the data sources: