Tim Ranzetta

/Tim Ranzetta
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About Tim Ranzetta

Tim's saving habits started at seven when a neighbor with a broken hip gave him a dog walking job. Her recovery, which took almost a year, resulted in Tim getting to know the bank tellers quite well (and accumulating a savings account balance of over $300!). His recent entrepreneurial adventures have included driving a shredding truck, analyzing executive compensation packages for Fortune 500 companies and helping families make better college financing decisions. After volunteering in 2010 to create and teach a personal finance program at Eastside College Prep in East Palo Alto, Tim saw firsthand the impact of an engaging and activity-based curriculum, which inspired him to start a new non-profit, Next Gen Personal Finance.

NGPF Podcast: Tim Talks to Author, Columnist and Personal Finance Advocate Beth Kobliner

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I had a great conversation with Beth Kobliner recently. Beth has an incredible personal finance focused CV. She’s been a columnist at Money Magazine, authored one (and soon to be two) New York Times Bestsellers (Get a Financial Life: Personal Finance in Your Twenties and Thirties), served on the President’s Advisory Council on Financial Capability, and gave financial advice to Elmo on Sesame Street (and a whole lot more too)! In this NGPF podcast, Beth shares the money lessons she learned growing up in Queens, New York as well as the motivation for her latest book, Make Your Kid a Money Genius, to be released in February. You will benefit from Beth’s insights on how to invest, use credit cards wisely and a simple test to control those impulsive purchases. Parents will find Beth’s new book a godsend in describing developmentally appropriate actions to build that financial decision-making muscle that your children need to thrive in this financially complex world. Enjoy!

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Question: What Are The Ten Most Popular Passwords?

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Before I answer, please let your students know if their password shows up below on this list, they better change it NOW!

Answer (from Consumerist):

By |January 19th, 2017|Current Events, Identity Theft, Question of the Day, Research|

NGPF Product Launch: NGPF Releases Revamped Savings Unit

I am so proud of the NGPF team (Jessica, Sonia, Laura, Ren, Sid and Niko) that has worked feverishly to deliver a revamped Saving Unit that we released tonight. Why do we continue to revamp our lessons? The short answer can be found in our culture of continuous improvement as we are always looking for ways to make our lessons stronger (your feedback is critical in this process). Here is the longer answer: 

Chart: How Much of Millennials’ Food Budget Is Spent on Dining Away From Home?

Answer: 47%

From The Atlantic/BLS:

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The chart is interesting when you look at it over a 20 year arc (instead of focusing on the short term ups and downs), where seniors have actually increased their dining away from home more than the other age groups (on a percentage basis).

From the Atlantic:

Let Them Tell Stories Too…

download (3)As educators, we know the power of storytelling in the personal finance classroom. What better way to bring an abstract or dry topic like compound interest to life than to explain how $10,000 you invested in your IRA in your 20s was now worth $30,000 today due to gains in the stock market compounded over many years. There is even research that shows that student recall concepts better when told as a story as compared to a lecture (from Bryant and Harris):

The use of storytelling allows lecturers to engage students in a dynamic and enthusiastic way while encouraging students to develop a higher order of thinking and recollection. Storytelling allows the lecturer to show their interest in the material and in the students. Lectures can utilize the art of storytelling to communicate expertise and transfer information. This paper empirically examines the effectiveness of storytelling as a means of increasing student intrigue and recollection. We find that students recall a statistically significant 6.5% more of the storytelling lecture than those students who were exposed to the text book lecture.

Yet the focus when we talk about stories is usually on the teacher and yet…students have their stories and advice to share also. I was reminded of that today at Eastside College Prep., where we are beginning our 6-week course with the senior class. The discussion was about savings and why it can be so difficult to save. A student shared how she had a weak spot for her “hobbies” which she described in further detail with one word: shoes. I dug a bit deeper to understand more about her habits and she proceeded to say something along the lines of this:

NGPF Podcast: Tim Talks Spreadsheets with Educator Jeff Shirey of Avonworth Middle/High Schools (PA)

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Thanks to Jeff Shirey of Avonworth Middle and High School (Pittsburgh, PA) for joining the NGPF podcast recently. In addition to being an accomplished salsa dancer outside the classroom (his living room has a dance floor), Jeff is a spreadsheet whiz inside the classroom. I became aware of Jeff’s work through this news story that focused on his passion for spreadsheets. Jeff shares his insights on favorite projects, how he introduces spreadsheets to his middle schoolers and how he differentiates instruction for his more advanced students. You will certainly walk away with some ideas on how to incorporate spreadsheets in your classroom. Enjoy!

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By |January 17th, 2017|Current Events, Podcasts, Teaching Strategies, Tips for Teachers|

Article: Can The Credit Scoring System Be Fixed?

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I was thinking about this question recently for two reasons: 1) the $23 million fine that CFPB handed down to a few credit reporting agencies for deceptive marketing around credit scores and 2) As fewer millennials choose credit compared to debit, the number of credit invisibles increase. So, what can we learn from this article from the Atlantic (approximately 10 minutes in length)?

My notes:

  • Chicken or the egg problem with credit: “If you think about the credit-invisible population in this country, their ability to enter the financial mainstream and access affordable credit instead of payday lenders and pawnshops and check-cashing services is tied to what’s in their credit report,” says Michael Turner, the president of the Policy and Economic Research Council. “They’re caught in the credit catch-22: In order to qualify for credit you have to have already had credit.”
By |January 16th, 2017|Article, Credit Reports, Credit Scores, WebQuest|

Chart: How Strong Are American’s Problem-Solving Skills Using A Computer?

From Economist:

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Answer: Meh (or about average for OECD countries with about 33% of adults classified in the “High” category).

This Economist article focused on the need for retraining of low-skilled workers as the pace of automation accelerates and many of their jobs go the way of the buggy whip. As for how to accomplish this, Singapore has a promising example:

By |January 16th, 2017|Article, Career, Chart of the Week, Current Events, Policy, Research|